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Prince Edward County Fire Department

FIRE DEPARTMENT NON-EMERGENCY: 613-476-2602

EMERGENCY: 911

Call in before you burn: 613-476-7232 or 613-962-3497

CO detectors will help battle Silent Killer

Prince Edward Hastings MPP Todd Smith and Oxford MPP Ernie Hardeman with Matt Hiraishi of the Insurance Bureau of Canada and PEC Fire Chief Scott Manlow at the presentation of carbon monoxide detectors.

Prince Edward Hastings MPP Todd Smith and Oxford MPP Ernie Hardeman with Matt Hiraishi of the Insurance Bureau of Canada and PEC Fire Chief Scott Manlow at the presentation of carbon monoxide detectors.

Prince Edward-Hastings MPP Todd Smith and Oxford MPP Ernie Hardeman delivered a donation of carbon monoxide (CO) detectors to the Prince Edward County Fire Department, at the Rossmore station, to mark the first Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week.

Carbon Monoxide is called the “silent killer” because it is a colourless, odourless, tasteless, toxic gas.

Hardeman’s private member’s bill, the Hawkins-Gignac Act was passed last year and mandates carbon monoxide detectors for every level of a home. MPPs across Ontario made donations to the fire departments in honour of the first CO awareness week.

The bill was named after OPP Const. Laurie (Gignac) Hawkins, whose family of four died from carbon monoxide poisoning in their Woodstock home. Hawkins was a community services officer known to schoolchildren across her service area, while her husband Richard was well-known through his service to minor hockey.

Though it took about five years to get the bill passed, Hardeman said the process helped make people more aware of the dangers of carbon monoxide in their homes and how important it is to have detectors.

“The Insurance Bureau of Canada has been graciously supplying all these detectors around the province. What we’re doing here is providing some detectors to the fire departments for when they start enforcing the rules for everybody to have one. If they get to a place where the cost might be prohibitive for people to get detectors, or if there is a disagreement between the tenant and the landlord, the fire department will have these to give out,” said Hardeman. “It’s a way to help them build awareness. It is the law today to have them, but there will be no charges laid for the next six months – until April 1, 2015.”

The average cost of a detector runs between $30 and $60. The brand does not matter as long as it is an approved unit.

“You must have a detector to know there’s carbon monoxide. The only other time we find out is when it’s too late. You can’t taste it, you can’t see it, you can’t smell it,” said Hardeman. “On average, 11 people die of CO poisoning every year in Ontario. And most of those, if they had the detector, they would not have died.”

“It is a valuable tool,” said Scott Manlow, the County’s fire chief. “This is a silent killer, as Ernie said. We will also be partnering with others, such as the Fire Mutual Aid, to help make them available to families in need. If the public has questions about them, they can contact our office at 476-2345.”

Carbon Monoxide is produced when carbon-based fuels are incompletely burned when using wood, propane, natural gas, heating oil, coal, kerosene, charcoal or gasoline. Wood burning/gas stoves, gas refrigerators, gasoline engines, kerosene heaters and others are the main sources in a home.

Some warning signs of a leak:
Headache, nausea, burning eyes, fainting, confusion, drowsiness.
Often mistaken for common ailments like the flu
Symptoms improve when away from the home for a period of time
Symptoms experienced by more than one member of the household.
Continued exposure to higher levels may result in unconscious, brain damage and death.
The elderly, children and people with heart or respiratory conditions may be particularly sensitive to carbon monoxide.

Environment
Air feels stale/stuffy
Excessive moisture on windows or walls
Sharp penetrating odour or smell of gas when furnace or other fuel burning appliance turns on.
Burning and pilot light flames are yellow/orange, not blue
Pilot light on the furnace or water heater goes out
Chalky white powder or soot build up occurs around exhaust vent or chimney.

* * *

Mayor Peter Mertens, Fire Prevention Officer Mike Branscombe, Deputy Fire Chief Robert Rutter, Union Gas' Phillip Langlois and local Fire Protection Advisor Dan Koroscil gathered for the $5.000 grant announcement.

Mayor Peter Mertens, Fire Prevention Officer Mike Branscombe, Deputy Fire Chief Robert Rutter, Union Gas’ Phillip Langlois and local Fire Protection Advisor Dan Koroscil gathered for the $5,000 grant announcement.

Firefighter training in Prince Edward County is now cooking with gas – Union Gas, that is – thanks to a $5,000 grant toward training materials.

The funds are part of a “Project Assist” campaign between the Fire Marshal’s Public Fire Safety Council and Union Gas to assist seven volunteer fire departments in the province in the purchase of firefighter training materials such as textbooks, presentations, videos and other resources.

“A well-trained fire department is able to meet challenge safely and better protect the people of Ontario,” said Phillip Langlois, Union Gas utility services construction manager. “Firefighters risk their lives every day to keep Ontarians safe and with these grants, we recognize their efforts and their dedication.”

PEC’s fire department was one of seven chosen through a random draw of applications.

Having access to up-to-date training materials is crucial to firefighter health and safety, said Dan Koroscil, Prince Edward Hastings Fire Protection Advisor with the Office of the Fire Marshal and Emergency Management.

“The Project assist donation from Union Gas will allow the Prince Edward County Fire Department to update its learning library for its 149 firefighters,” said Chief Scott Manlow.

The County firefighters are responsible for 1,048 sq. km coverage area including 1,100 km of roads and 800 km of shore line. The department has 144 volunteers, five full time staff and four administration staff. Firefighting services include structural, vehicle and grass/brush fires, medical first response, vehicle accidents and extrications and ice water rescue. The PEC Fire Department also feature educational programs for the County’s schools and community.

Officials at the ground breaking ceremony included Dan Bakker, Division 6 Commander, councillor Terry Shortt, Fire Chief Scott Manlow, Mayor Peter Mertens and Susan Turnbull, Commissioner of Corporate Services and Finance.

Officials at the ground breaking ceremony included Dan Bakker, Division 6 Commander, councillor Terry Shortt, Fire Chief Scott Manlow, Mayor Peter Mertens and Susan Turnbull, Commissioner of Corporate Services and Finance.

New fire station at Consecon under way

County officials and staff turned the sod at the site of the new Consecon fire station Mondy morning, officially beginning construction on the $1.3 million project.

The new Mill Street station is to replace older and unsafe Consecon and Hillier halls, and is expected to be complete by February.

“Building a new fire station in Consecon recognizes and addresses the need to upgrade the County fire department’s facilities,” said Fire Chief Scott Manlow. “By building a new, safe, and efficient station, our firefighters will feel confident providing effective emergency response to the surrounding community for many years to come.”

Costs for the new station – including four bays, a training hall with a kitchenette, office space and a workshop – were tendered at $1,285,500 plus up to $35,000 for a generator.

The station’s location is also expected to allow for insurance reductions for residents in the surrounding area.

MHPM Project Managers (Ottawa) are assisting the County with the overview of the project, while Dalren Limited (Cobourg) will be constructing the facility which was designed by Colbourne & Kemble Architect Inc. (Kingston).

“I am pleased see the shovel hit the ground to begin the construction on this much needed facility” said Mayor Peter Mertens. “The Master Fire Plan has been an ongoing focus of council for the last four years and it is rewarding to see this plan realized as council reaches the end of its term.”

Also included in the Master Fire Plan is construction of a new Picton hall to be built in the industrial park.

Mutual Fire Aid Association receives $10,000 donation

Mutual-Fire-Association-donation

Enbridge Inc. has shown its support of the Hastings & Prince Edward Counties Fire Training Complex with a donation of $10,000 toward the purchase of safety equipment for its new training facility. Among the new equipment are radios, air fill stations, hoses, fire truck appliances and textbooks for future training needs. The donation was presented to Prince Edward County Deputy Fire Chief, Robert Rutter Friday at the Picton Fire Hall.

The Hastings & Prince Edward Counties Fire Training Complex is used by the 17 member fire departments of the Hastings & Prince Edward Counties Mutual Fire Aid Association. The military base, some police forces, industrial emergency crews, municipal employees and fire fighters from outside the area use the training facility or have attended courses at the complex.

“We are pleased to support the Hastings & Prince Edward Counties Fire Training Complex because it helps keep the community safe,” said Ken Hall, Senior Advisor, Public Affairs with Enbridge. “The new equipment is essential to providing the best training experience for the communities’ front line of emergency responders.”

The Enbridge Safe Community Program provides financial support to first responders and safety driven organizations to acquire new equipment, obtain professional training or deliver educational programs. The program has provided funding to organizations across Canada for more than four years.

From left: Richard Craibbe, Chief Training Officer, Oakville Fire Department, Fire Safety Awards Selection Committee, Mike Branscombe, Fire Prevention Officer, Prince Edward County, Alex Korchuk and Ted Wieclawek, Fire Marshal of Ontario

From left: Richard Craibbe, Chief Training Officer, Oakville Fire Department, Fire Safety Awards Selection Committee, Mike Branscombe, Fire Prevention Officer, Prince Edward County, Alex Korchuk and Ted Wieclawek, Fire Marshal of Ontario

The Fire Marshal’s Public Safety Fire Council has recognized Alex Korchuk, 7, with a Fire Safety Action Award, because of his quick action and fire safety knowledge.

Last December, Alex was asleep in his home in Picton when he was awakened by the sound of a smoke alarm. He woke his father, telling him the alarms were going off and the house was filling with smoke. He then woke his two older brothers, leading them to safety. His father ran to the recreation room and found the wall unit on fire and the main floor full of smoke.

Alex remained calm throughout the incident while his father extinguished the fire and called the Prince Edward County Fire Department.

Prince Edward County Fire Prevention Officer Mike Branscombe had visited Alex’s school just months before to teach the class about fire safety, staying calm and family fire evacuation plans.

“Alex’s quick actions demonstrated a solid understanding of fire safety and family evacuation,” said Branscombe. “Not only was Alex prepared, but his family was prepared. They had discussed evacuation plans which avoided a potentially tragic situation.”

“Although the house suffered some fire and smoke damage, the family was able to return home a week later,” said Ted Wieclawek, Chair, Fire Marshal’s Public Fire Safety Council. “Because of Alex’s quick actions and fire safety knowledge, the damage was relatively minor and, most importantly, everyone safely escaped.”

The Prince Edward County Fire Department regularly visits local schools to teach students about fire safety, fire evacuation plans and procedures and more. The intent is to spark discussion in the classroom that students will take home and talk about fire safety with their family.

“Education is key to fire prevention and fire safety,” said Scott Manlow, PEC Fire. “We are so proud of Alex and how he applied what he learned in the classroom to a real-life situation. Teaching fire safety in schools is so important and the dividends are immeasurable.”

Fire Safety Action Awards are awarded to children and teenagers who have actively demonstrated fire safety behaviours they have learned. Alex will also be recognized by both the County Fire Department and the mayor at a meeting of Prince Edward County Council this summer.

MARCH 17 2014 – barn-fire-cty-rd-8Prince Edward County firefighters are on the scene of a small fire at a barn on County Road 8 between Bradley Crossroad and County Road 25 this afternoon.

“There’s no livestock and no hay and just minor damage to the south end of the barn,” said Robert Rutter, PEC Deputy Fire Chief. “Firefighters have done a great job with the knock down of the fire. It’s contained now and the fire is out.”

* * *

firefighters-calendar-2014

$15,000 in proceeds from the 2014 PEC Firefighter Calendar was distributed equally to ALS Quinte in memory of Greg Minaker, firefighter for South Marysburgh, Muscular Dystrophy and Hospice Prince Edward. The idea, says Tammy Storms, was devised at a family dinner to raise funds and create a project that involved all the firefighters from each division – 139 volunteers and five full-time firefighters from Division 1 – Picton, Division 2 – Hallowell, Division 3 – South Marysburgh, Division 4 – Sophiasburgh, Division 5 – Ameliasburgh and Division 6 – Hillier/Wellington.

* * *

The fire started around 2 a.m. on Saturday inside Chris and Shirley Byford's barn, on Bethel Road, south of Demorestville. - Shauna Duguay Byford photo

The fire started around 2 a.m. on Saturday inside Chris and Shirley Byford’s barn, on Bethel Road, south of Demorestville. – Shauna Duguay Byford photo

Shauna Duguay Byford photo

Shauna Duguay Byford photo

Though it’s hard to see it through the thick, grey smoke still pouring out of the family’s barn on Sunday afternoon, Shirley Byford knows there’s light at the end of the tunnel and she is thankful for Prince Edward County firefighters who started battling the stubborn blaze 36 hours earlier.

County firefighters were called to the blaze at about 2 a.m. Saturday morning on Bethel Road, south of Demorestville. The massive barn and nearby quonsite – containing more than 500 bales of hay and straw – were fully engulfed.

That evening’s rain and snow were some help to dampen hot spots, but by Sunday at around 2 p.m., a call went out for more firefighters as more hot spots in bales ignited and smoked.

“It could have been a lot worse. It could have went well beyond, we know,” Shirley Byford said, watching over the area with family and friends, expressing worry about her husband Chris, who had spent the whole time working with the firefighters.

More than 200 sheep were in the barn at the time of the blaze. “They were lambing,” she said, pointing to a fenced area where those who had been weaned from their mothers a few weeks ago, had survived.

The family also expressed thanks to neighbour who was able to take some to his farm. A call for pitch forks from neighbouring farmers was also answered to help firefighters work through the bales.

“There are a lot of people to thank,” said Shirley. “The firefighters are so wonderful.”

By 4 p.m. the smoke was still filling the air. The cause of the blaze is as yet unknown. It is believed there were no injuries to firefighters.

by Sunday at around 2 p.m., a call went out for more firefighters as more hot spots in bales ignited and smoked.

By Sunday at around 2 p.m., a call went out for more firefighters as more hot spots in bales ignited and smoked.

Byford-Barn-fire-Sunday-SC-

Thick smoke was still pouring out of the family’s barn on Sunday afternoon.

dust-mask-outsidedust-mask-inside

 

 

Firefighters, family and bystanders were offered dust masks to help block smoke from entering lungs. At left, the smokey outside of a dust mask, at right, the inside, still clean, after a little more than an hour.

* * *

Ontario Fire Marshal Offers Tips to Protect Your Family

While the holiday season is a great time to cook and decorate with family and friends, it is also a time to pay extra attention to fire safety.

Here is a list of 10 fire prevention tips from the Ontario Fire Marshal’s 12 Days of Holiday Fire Safety campaign that will help keep you safe during the holidays:

  1. Keep space heaters at least three feet away from anything that can burn.
  2. Stay in the kitchen when cooking, especially when using oil or cooking at high temperatures.
  3. Make sure you have working smoke and carbon monoxide alarms. Smoke alarms should be on every storey and outside all sleeping areas of your home.
  4. Check and throw away old and damaged lights before decorating.
  5. Keep the base of your Christmas tree in water at all times, and keep it away from fireplaces, heaters and candles.
  6. Keep candles away from children and pets and always remember to blow them out before leaving a room.
  7. Make sure everyone knows two ways out of your home and practise a home escape plan with everyone in your household.
  8. Determine who will be responsible for helping young children, older adults or anyone else that may require assistance to escape.
  9. Check that all exits and escape routes are kept clear and easy to access at all times.
  10. In case of fire, call the fire department from outside the home, from a cellphone or neighbour’s home.

QUICK FACTS

  • The top five causes of fires in December are from heating equipment, unattended cooking, electrical distribution equipment, cigarettes and appliances.
  • Last December, there were 60 injuries and eight fatalities related to home fires in the province.
  • Last year, there were either no smoke alarms or the alarms were not working in 35 per cent of preventable fires.

firefighters-supportHallowell Firefighters Association members showed their support to three community programs this week sharing money raised at their Maple in the County pancake breakfast.
The CAS Angel Campaign, the Picton United Church County Food Bank and the Salvation Army kettle fund were each presented $1,000.

Campaign assistant Elisha MacDonald says 337 children have been looked after so far, and shares this photograph of the tree full on angels in need as of Dec. 2.

Campaign assistant Elisha MacDonald says 337 children have been looked after so far, and shares this photograph of the tree full on angels in need as of Dec. 2.

“We raised the money with County support and in turn we are supporting the County,” said association treasurer Wes Manlow. “This is the season and we know they can put this money to good use.”

Thanking the firefighters for their generosity were Chief Angel Susan Rose, the Food Bank’s Patricia Romkey and Dean Lock, of the Salvation Army.
“We still have about 50 or so angels left on the tree,” said Chief Angel Susan Rose, who admits to being a little worried, but optimistic.

For those who do not wish to shop for a specific child, donations of food are also welcome, as are donations of cash.
For details on how you can help, visit, or call Susan Rose at the Benson Hall, Picton office: 613-849-2286

The Angel Campaign, Salvation Army and the Picton and Wellington food banks maintain master lists to help ensure all who need assistance are served without duplication.

Grade 3, 4, 5 students at Sonrise Christian Academy show off their T-shirts with Sparky The Firedog and Fire Prevention Officer Mike Branscombe

Grade 3, 4, 5 students at Sonrise Christian Academy show off their T-shirts with Sparky the Fire Dog and Fire Prevention Officer Mike Branscombe

The Prince Edward County fire department rewarded students at Sonrise Christian Academy with a pizza party – in thanks for helping their families with a fire safety plan.

As part of this year’s Fire Prevention Week, students in County schools were asked to develop family escape plans, while educating their family about fire safety. The pizza party was provided to the school with the highest percentage of escape plans created.

Prince Edward County’s Fire Prevention Officer, Mike Branscombe, visited 12 local schools, educating students about fire prevention in the kitchen. He challenged students to take what they learned home to create a fire escape plan for their own home and family. In total, nearly 100 students developed plans.

“Education and preparation are key to fire safety and prevention,” said Branscombe. “I’d like to thank the 12 participating schools for joining in and acknowledging the importance of teaching fire safety in schools.”

“The students were excited to complete and hand in their home escape plans,” said Sonrise Christian Academy principal, Julie Scrivens. “This initiative on the part of the fire department is a great strategy to encourage families to start the conversation about fire safety and prevention in their homes.”

In addition to a pizza lunch from Prince Edward Pizza in Picton, Sparky the Fire Dog presented each student with a special fire safety t-shirt.

PEC-FD-Tanker-1-Nov2013The fire department has added a new tanker truck to the County’s fleet of fire-fighting vehicles.

The $242,000 tanker is the second of its type, and will be stationed to service areas in and around Wellington.

The acquisition comes from council’s 10-year capital plan designed to retire and replace the department’s vehicles. A bidding process was held in 2012 and
Dependable Emergency Vehicles of Brampton was contracted to provide the tanker.

Cost, design, warranty, service and delivery were key considerations in selecting the manufacturer, said Fire Chief Scott Manlow.
It was delivered in November 2013 for a total cost of $242,000 and replaces a 23-year old vehicle.

“In addition to providing firefighters with the latest equipment to keep residents safe, the new trucks will reduce the fire department’s vehicle maintenance costs, positively impact the County’s insurance underwriter’s rating, and generally supports the County’s Strategic Plan objective of providing an efficient, effective and responsive municipal government,” said Manlow.

With the 10-year plan currently under way, new trucks will be added on a yearly basis at a cost already accommodated in the annual budget.

“The addition of the new tanker ensures that our firefighters have the equipment they need to serve residents and the community for years to come,” he said. “On behalf of the Prince Edward County Fire Department, I’d like to thank council for recognizing the value, and committing to upgrading the County’s fleet of vehicles.”

* * *

pec-firefighter-calendarNew PEC Firefighter Calendar! Contact Bernie Dunphy at the Picton Fire Hall or stop in to Pure County Water. $10 each and the proceeds will be going to County charities [ALS Quinte in Memory of Greg Minaker, firefighter for South Marysburgh, Muscular Dystrophy and Hospice Prince Edward.] This calendar has all 6 Divisions covered (that is 139 volunteers and 5 fulltime firefighters) from Division 1 – Picton, Division 2 – Hallowell, Division 3 – South Marysburgh, Division 4 – Sophiasburgh, Division 5 – Ameliasburgh and Division 6 – Hillier/Wellington.

* * *

Enbridge Pipelines Inc. presented a $10,000 Safe Community donation toward the expansion of the Hastings-Prince Edward Counties Fire Mutual Aid Association training tower. Enbridge representative J.D. Booth (far left) is pictured making the donation to association officials, including, from left: Deputy Fire Chief Robert Rutter of Prince Edward County; Chuck Naphan of the Quinte West Fire Department (and president of the Mutual Aid Association); Fire Chief Richard Caddick of the Township of Stirling-Rawdon; and Belleville Mayor Neil Ellis.

Enbridge Pipelines Inc. presented a $10,000 Safe Community donation toward the expansion of the Hastings-Prince Edward Counties Fire Mutual Aid Association training tower. Enbridge representative J.D. Booth (far left) is pictured making the donation to association officials, including, from left: Deputy Fire Chief Robert Rutter of Prince Edward County; Chuck Naphan of the Quinte West Fire Department (and president of the Mutual Aid Association); Fire Chief Richard Caddick of the Township of Stirling-Rawdon; and Belleville Mayor Neil Ellis.

* * *

Area firefighters kicked off Fire Prevention Week early with a $10,000 donation toward the Hastings Prince Edward Mutual Fire Aid Training Complex facility upgrades.

fire-towerThe project cost is estimated at $400,000 in upgrades for the facility, located in Trenton, where 17 area fire departments receive hands-on fire fighting training and take Ontario Fire College courses and certifications.

The association is also seeking provincial and federal investment over five years for upgrades, including water, sewer and natural gas connections. Over the past few years, the facility has expanded to include police training for emergency response teams and canine units.

The rescue training facility on Chester Road in Trenton is the only training facility in eastern Ontario, the closest being the fire college in Gravenhurst.
The site includes a training tower, maze building and garage, classroom and washrooms.

“We are at the very early stages of fundraising, said Robert Rutter, PEC Deputy Fire Chief. “The original training tower building is now 30 years old. A raffle for a fully loaded Ford Lariat is now under way. Just 2,500 tickets are being sold at $100 each. Tickets are available at the Picton Fire Hall. The draw will be held Dec. 1.

During Fire Prevention Week, the Prince Edward County Fire Department will be in the community educating children and adults on fire prevention and in particular, preventing kitchen fires.

With support from local businesses, the Prince Edward County Fire Department is giving local Grade 4 and Grade 5 students the opportunity to participate in an educational fire safety initiative designed to prevent fire-related injuries and fatalities. Fire Prevention Officer Mike Branscombe will be presenting the program and giving students a copy of the handbook Fire Safety: Smart Choices for LIFE – a resource designed to educate children and families about fire safety. The handbooks will be distributed to students in nine Prince Edward County elementary schools.

“On behalf of the fire department, I would like to thank the local businesses who generously supported this initiative,” said Branscombe. “While the program rolls out in the classroom, we are urging kids to talk to their parents about fire prevention and to come up with a family plan.”

In addition to visiting local schools, the Fire Department will be going door-to-door to raise awareness about Fire Prevention Week, check for working smoke alarms, and educate the public about fire prevention in the kitchen.

Careless cooking is the number one cause of home fires in Ontario. Most of these fires start because pots and pans are left unattended on the stove.

If you must leave the kitchen when you are cooking, turn off the stove. While cooking, always keep a large lid nearby.

If a pot does catch fire, slide the lid over the pot, then turn off the stove.

Many fire injuries and deaths are caused by:
• Unattended cooking and distractions
• Loose clothing and articles near the stove
• Children playing near the stove
• Attempting to extinguish a grease fire with water
• Attempting to cook while under the influence of alcohol.

Always make sure to:
• Stay in the kitchen and pay attention when cooking!
• Drink responsibly when cooking.
• If a fire occurs, get out immediately and call 911

Fire Prevention Week was established to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire, the tragic 1871 conflagration that killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres. The fire began on October 8, but continued into and did most of its damage on October 9, 1871.

http://www.videodelivery.gov.on.ca/player/download.php?file=http://www.media.gov.on.ca/a7bf200a5b80f320/en/pages/text.html

NEWfiretruck2NEWfiretruck1With the purpose of improving emergency response times, increasing safety measures for firefighters and enhancing overall operations of the fire department, three new trucks – two pumpers and one tanker – have been added to Prince Edward County’s fleet of vehicles.

“On behalf of the fire department, I would like to thank County council for their support by approving the 10-year plan for the replacement of the fire department’s vehicles,” said Fire Chief Scott Manlow. “These new vehicles will serve the community for a number of years to come.”

In 2012, council approved a 10-year capital plan designed to retire and replace the department’s vehicles. A bidding process was held in 2012 and Dependable Emergency Vehicles of Brampton, Ontario was contracted to provide the two pumper trucks and one 1800-gallon tanker. The trucks were delivered in early 2013 for a total cost of $662,550.

The pumpers are located in Ameliasburgh (Rossmore Station) and Bloomfield (Mallory Station), and the tanker is servicing the Hallowell region (Heights Station). Cost, design, warranty, service and delivery were key considerations in selecting the manufacturer.

“Public safety is the County’s top priority,” said mayor Peter Mertens. “We are committed to ensuring our firefighters are equipped with equipment designed to keep our residents safe.”

The new trucks will replace two 27-year old pumpers and one 30-year old tanker. In addition to providing increased safety measures, the new trucks will reduce the fire department’s vehicle maintenance costs, positively impact the County’s insurance underwriter’s rating.

With the 10-year plan currently under way, new trucks will be added on a yearly basis at a cost already accommodated in the annual budget.

Firefighters-Assoc.-HospiceThe Picton Fire Fighters Association presented $500 to Hospice Prince Edward’s Lighting the Way Campaign. The team challenges the County’s other fire halls to match the donation they realized from the annual Christmas tree sale. From left, Mark Davis, Lighting The Way Campaign Chair, Mike Vidito, Shawn Whalen, Gord Bell, Jason Young and Nancy Parks, Hospice Prince Edward Executive Director.

Spring-Alert-April-10

Call in before you burn: 613-476-7232 or 613-962-3497

Residents can activate their burn permit by dialing in on a touch tone phone to the automated system, where they will be prompted to notify the fire department of their intention to burn by entering their four digit burn permit number.
Users who do not have a touch tone phone are directed to dial 613-476-2345, which will connect the individual directly to the fire department and allow them to activate their permit.

Permits are valid from date of issue to December 31st of the year issued and cost $15 each.

Permits can be purchased at the following Municipal Offices:

• Picton Fire Station 2 Ross Street, Picton All hours

• Shire Hall 332 Main Street, Picton – Mon.- Fri. 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

• Prince Edward County libraries

CLICK on application to print – fill out the information and submit to the above mentioned offices

BURN-PERMIT_2013
Volunteer firefighters are your neighbours, your co-workers and your friends. They are the men and women who respond to emergencies in Prince Edward County.

The fire department provides a range of programs to protect the lives and property of the residents of Prince Edward County from the adverse effects of fire, sudden medical emergencies or exposure to dangerous conditions created by man or nature.
The Fire Department is responsible for firefighting, investigations, inspections and prevention services and responsibilities include education and program services, inquiries, fire code enforcement, fire engineering plans, fire suppression, rescue services, emergency defibrillation and medical assist services, and ice water rescue.

If you are interested in becoming a volunteer, print off the application (link below), or pick one up at The Prince Edward County Fire Department, 2 Ross St., Picton.

http://pecounty.on.ca/government/corporate_services/pdf/FirevolunteerFFad.pdf

Below a video from a training session.

 


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